Tuesday, April 12, 2011

50 Years: Redux

 Earlier I had posted about the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's first flight, known as Yuri's Night. Well, I also learned that a movie has been made, just premiered in fact, called First Orbit. It is a real time recreation of Yuri's 108 minute flight, using the original mission audio from Yuri's flight and shot from the ISS by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli with a musical score by composer Philip Sheppard.


The audio is subtitled in English and runs about 140 minutes. It is completely free and on Youtube (embedded below) and on their website: firstorbit.org. I just started watching it and I have to say, the high definition video really gives justice to this historic anniversary. I hope you take the time to enjoy!


20 comments:

Necroticism said...

Let's wait for that documentary, looks awesome.

Zombie said...

Looks pretty cool!

mac-and-me said...

amazing

Alan said...

That documentary looks awesome. Space is so breath taking...

Jay said...

i'm gonna download this and watch it later, thanks!

DailyDubstep said...

interesting post! the universe is so beautiful.

Patti D. said...

very interesting, thanks for posting it

akrater said...

Nice documentary

Melanie said...

very awesome!

Grafted said...

I watched it in it's entirety (which I wasn't planning on) That was beautiful, almost haunting. I'm so glad I watched it.

Kamchatka said...

This video is fascinating! Imagine just being an astronaut... Thanks for sharing!

Banacek said...

Pretty damn cool.

Toto said...

nice stuff!

WanderingWriter said...

Very cool! I know what I'm watching tonight.

G said...

I think it's crazy that all that was only 50 years ago...

Biff Tanner said...

Marked thanks

Aaron M. Gipson said...

This reminds me of a question I've been meaning to ask you. I heard (on AM Coast to Coast mind you) Richard Hoagland tell a story about a female Russian Cosmonaut who ended up dying in orbit just after the time of Gagarin's flight. Supposedly her distress call is "stuck" in a portion of the magnetosphere so that it's possible to hear it repeat every few hours to this day. I listened to the recording, and it's creepy as all get out. Is there ANY truth to this, or is it just Hoagland being Hoagland?

Astronomy Pirate said...

Honestly, I hadn't heard of that before Aaron. I don't think it's possible for a distress signal to get "stuck" in the magnetosphere, it is a very violent and dynamic place. It is always snapping, wiping out and reforming, that's what causes the aurora.

Just to humor you though, I did search for dead female cosmonauts, and the only thing I saw that might be related is a possible Mirya Gromova. She apparently flew a test 'space plane' into 'oblivion'. This is plausible, because it was in an era where not much is known of what the Soviet Union was doing. There is much speculation on human deaths prior to Gagarin's success, and it is even admitted now that Gagarin wasn't in the best of health when he landed. Notice how silent it got near the end of that video, no checks to say that he was landing, a marked discrepancy from the early moments of the flight.

Aaron M. Gipson said...

Yeah since asking you this, I did some research as well. This is the recording I heard...

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=107289539300990&oid=111408268875463&comments&ref=mf

Very heart wrenching stuff indeed. I hope at least her family was informed.

Astronomy Pirate said...

Yeah, it sounds fake to me. Just saying, the voice doesn't sound distinctly Russian enough, and there doesn't seem to be any launches the coincided with this particular incident. This being a time when the US was listening for any launch in case of a nuclear attack.

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